Wall Squat Variation

This is a wall-squat variation I use to emphasise the need for neutral spine during an isometric quad contraction. 

Shelby cannot dorsio-flex her right foot, so squatting bilaterally is not possible, however we want to improve her ability to hold a good position on a horse as she is an equestrian athlete. 

Wall squat variation

This is a wall-squat variation I use to emphasise the need for neutral spine during an isometric quad contraction. Shelby cannot dorsio-flex her right foot, so squatting bilaterally is not possible, however we want to improve her ability to hold a good position on a horse as she is an equestrian athlete. The normal wall squat is tedious at best after a few weeks. So, to add in more complexity, and another challenge we use the plate to change the way force is produced and needs to be reduced or stabilised. The up and down motion of the weight is great as it also acts as a scapula stability and shoulder strengthening exercise. The more important factor in this however, is that its done whilst holding an isometric lower limb position (contraction). The progressions here are to increase the speed of the movement of weight, use partial rotation without moving the trunk, slight up and down motion using two rollers one on lumbar spine and one on thoracic spine on the wall, to decrease stability and to help with movement. There is no reason that someone "CANNOT" do something most of the time. It takes thought and application of basic anatomy and principles of biomechanics to figure out ways to challenge someone without asking of them what they cannot deliver. Well done to Shelby. Never a word of complaint, nothing has ever seemed too tough, or too complicated to try. You set a great example of the attitude required to win, everyday. Never give up, never stop looking for more. #equestrian #specialolympics #vectorhealth

Posted by Vector Health on Wednesday, 29 May 2019

The normal wall squat is tedious at best after a few weeks. So, to add in more complexity, and another challenge we use the plate to change the way force is produced and needs to be reduced or stabilised. 

The up and down motion of the weight is great as it also acts as a scapula stability and shoulder strengthening exercise. The more important factor in this however, is that its done whilst holding an isometric lower limb position (contraction). 

The progressions here are to increase the speed of the movement of weight, use partial rotation without moving the trunk, slight up and down motion using two rollers one on lumbar spine and one on thoracic spine on the wall, to decrease stability and to help with movement. 

There is no reason that someone “CANNOT” do something most of the time. It takes thought and application of basic anatomy and principles of biomechanics to figure out ways to challenge someone without asking of them what they cannot deliver. 

Well done to Shelby. Never a word of complaint, nothing has ever seemed too tough, or too complicated to try. You set a great example of the attitude required to win, everyday. Never give up, never stop looking for more. 

#equestrian#specialolympics#vectorhealth

#VHAP #VHAPCOACHES Owner and Head Coach Glenn Hansen

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